Life"s little ironies
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Life"s little ironies

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Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Wessex (England)

Subjects:

  • Wessex (England) -- Fiction

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxxvi]-xxxvii).

StatementThomas Hardy ; edited by Alan Manford ; with an introduction by Norman Page.
GenreFiction.
SeriesOxford world"s classics, Oxford world"s classics (Oxford University Press)
ContributionsManford, Alan.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR4750 .L549 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationxlii, 251 p. :
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6803851M
LC Control Number00266191

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Interesting little vignettes, well told and visually inspired. An ingenious way for Hardy to weave his tales and hold the interest of the reader. Interesting little tales shine some light on Hardy's artistry, and they give us insights into Victorian small-town life. Some of them could have been expanded into novels/5(44).   The book draws attention to the ironies of how one friend's lost opportunity becomes another friend's stepping stone to success. And how the turning fortunes of a childhood friend can earn the. Read A Few Crusted Characters of Life's Little Ironies by Thomas Hardy. The text begins: It is a Saturday afternoon of blue and yellow autumn time, and the scene is the High Street of a well-known market-town. A large carrier’s van stands in the quadrangular fore-court of the White Hart Inn, upon the sides of its spacious tilt being painted, in weather-beaten letters: ‘Burthen, . Read On the Western Circuit - Chapter IV of Life's Little Ironies by Thomas Hardy. The text begins: To return now to the moment at which Anna, at Melchester, had received Raye’s letter. It had been put into her own hand by the postman on his morning rounds. She flushed down to her neck on receipt of it, and turned it over and over.